this post on taste of Beirut

I instantly fell in love with the idea. It was so simple and beautiful. I had to try it.

Sfeeha is a meat filling on a dough. (I’ve talked about them briefly before)

Sfeehas in Brazil comes in two ways. Open and closed ones. They ...

" />
 

Sfeeha on the easy

June 26, 2011, 6:39 p.m. | by Adriano Petrich | Categories: easy lebanese meat | comments

Sfeeha on the easy

Sfeeha on a pita

I got this idea from this post on taste of Beirut

I instantly fell in love with the idea. It was so simple and beautiful. I had to try it.

Sfeeha is a meat filling on a dough. (I’ve talked about them briefly before)

Sfeehas in Brazil comes in two ways. Open and closed ones. They (usually) differ only on the shape of the dough. Open ones are like these, closed ones look like triangles (the dough is fold three ways around the filling).

Sfeehas are so common here in Sao Paulo that you can choose an broad range of fillings. Traditionally is beef, but I like the cheese ones with basterma:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Past%C4%B1rma on top.


I wouldn’t dare doing a recipe like this

It is weird, because even though we have a lot of Lebanese immigrants (more Lebanese here than in Lebanon as far as I’ve heard) and sfeeha has been incorporated in the local culture here in Sao Paulo. The idea still seemed to far off.

I could fathom using a pita for a home easy pizza, like adding tomato sauce and cheese on top and baking it, but never create a sfeeha.


The perfect easy meal

30 minutes start to finish including the queue at the butcher (disclaimer: the butcher is less than 200 meters from home so your time may vary).

Get home, preheat the oven, slice the onions and tomatoes (I used a regular one instead of paste), mix with the meat, spread it on the pitas and bake it.

It will get ready while you are finishing setting up the table.


That is not a garnish.

The way that we eat sfeehas here is you squeeze some lime juice in it. I’ve heard from some more hardcore Lebanese that that’s not they way you are supposed to do.

The alternative I’ve found thanks to a Lebanese chef that I admire is to zest some lime on top of it. It will give you all the lemony taste and smell that I want without needing to add acidity.

Try that. It is amazingly good.


 
blog comments powered by Disqus
 

See more


 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License.